Everything You Need to Know about Networking on LinkedIn

Everything You Need to Know about Networking on LinkedIn


Hello, everyone. And thank you for joining us for
today’s BU Alumni Career Week webinar, everything
you need to know about networking on LinkedIn. My name is Dan Gardiner and I’m
a member of the alumni career programs team in the
office of alumni relations. Today’s webinar is sponsored
by BU Alumni Relations, and it’s offered to our 326,000
alumni all around the globe. Throughout your
career, BU is committed to helping you
define and achieve your professional goals. We aim to do this
by providing alumni with access to a series of
online tools and social media communities. It’s important that we get your
opinion on how we’re doing, so please complete
our alumni career week survey if you haven’t already. I know that we have
alumni joining us today from over a dozen countries,
in places like Switzerland, three different provinces
throughout China, Paris, Jakarta, Mumbai, Milan, Bangkok,
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, Ridgeway, Colorado, Pearl City, Hawaii,
West Lafayette, Indiana, and as always, dozens
of Massachusetts alumni from towns like [inaudible],,
Oak Bluff, Longmeadow, [inaudible],, Marblehead,
Newburyport, Dorchester, and so many more. For each and every
one of you out there, please know that
we really do value your opinion on this and
every program that we offer. And before I introduce
today’s speaker, just a few housekeeping notes. As you know by now,
this presentation is being hosted on our new
zoom online meaning platform. And if you experience any
trouble with the audio or visual portion
of the presentation, please contact zoom
support at 1-888-799-9666. Today’s presentation
is being recorded and will soon be available for
on-demand viewing on the Alumni Association website. You can find it
at bu.edu/alumni. Our speaker today is very
eager to answer any questions that you may have. So please submit them
throughout the presentation using the chatbox. And you can find
it just by hovering over either the top or bottom of
your screen and selecting chat. Now, it’s my pleasure
to introduce our speaker for the day, BU College
of Arts and Sciences alumna, Lisa Frumin. Lisa is a leadership
and career coach who helps people who
feel stuck in their jobs and are seeking more in
their lives to figure out what they want to do and how
to transition into careers that they love. Throughout her own career,
Lisa swore by the mantra, you have to work
hard to get anything worth having in your life,
but as learned that, in fact, her career has come
easily through transitions from working in the
Senate Banking Committee during the US financial
crisis, to graduate school, to multiple career transitions
in the Federal Reserve. Her passion is to share
these insights and coach clients to find the
confidence in their job search as well as the fun. People who leave
Lisa’s [inaudible] have expanded their confidence
in their job searches, fine-tuned their resumes
and cover letters to tell their authentic stories. And they’ve landed
jobs in government, including at the
Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the office of
the mayor of the District of Columbia, and in
the private sector, including [inaudible]
Strategic Advisors, Booz Allen McKinsey and Company,
and many, many more. Lisa is a certified career
coach through Inner Glow Circle and has complete
various course work through gratitude
training, a group coaching program in Florida. Lisa has a BA from
Boston University and also an MA from
Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced
International Studies. Lisa, thank you so much for
being here today and the floor is all yours. [inaudible] I’m really
excited to be here with you. And we’re going to
jump right into what we’re talking about today. I see that there’s a request
to speak a little bit slower. I will do my best to keep
this within the hour, so apologies if the speed
is a little bit faster. Remember that this
is being recorded, so you will be able to listen
to this again when you can. I will be cut– I’m not covering
this for sales, I’m covering this really for
networking for a job search. So just to be clear to
the person who just posted that, this is about
networking, first and foremost, through LinkedIn. So I want to start with a quote. This is a very
important one for me. I love Paulo Coelho
and his quote, “there is always a gap
between intention and action.” So, many of us
have the intention of having an awesome
LinkedIn profile, but often times we don’t know
where to go when it comes to a LinkedIn profile. And it’s not just
with LinkedIn, right? But we’re going to talk about
it from this perspective. And what I want to do is
help to move you into action so that your intentions and
your actions line up today and you have new ways
of incorporating actions to your LinkedIn
profile so that you are networking in the
most effective way possible on LinkedIn. So who experiences
LinkedIn profile shame? Say me in the chat
box right now. I’d love to see who is
experiencing this today. Thank you, I’m seeing
S Dunbar said me. Anybody else, please feel free
to also post to all panelists. Yes, thank you,
Michael, Jen, Bob. So there’s the number of people
who are experiencing this. I’m seeing a lot more
people coming in with this. And it is totally normal. You are not alone. And that’s exactly why
I asked this question, because so many people are
here today for the exact reason that you’re here today, which
is that experience of LinkedIn profile will shame, that
intention to want to change it but needing to know
what to change. So now we’re going to
be talking about that. So grab a pen and
paper for today. Get your water
bottle next to you. You’re going to be here
for an hour with me, and we’re going to talk
through all of this together. So here’s the
agenda for the day. We’re going to first find out
why having a LinkedIn profile is so important in
this day and age. Then we’re going to talk
about the five steps to crafting a LinkedIn
profile that stands out. And then we’re going to talk
about how to effectively network on LinkedIn. So the way I talk about
LinkedIn, first and foremost, the profile is so important
for passive networking. It is a way to get
recruiters and hiring managers to be focused on you. And then on top
of that, there are ways to be a lot more actively
networking on LinkedIn as well and we’re going to go
through those steps as well. So who am I? Dan gave a wonderful opening
explanation of who I am. But I do want to talk to
you about who I am in terms of a career coach more clearly. I used to be the person who
ran away from networking, both online and in person. I didn’t want anything
to do with it. And I would rather
sit behind my computer and apply for jobs online rather
than reaching out to people and finding people who might
be able to help me find a job. But here’s the thing,
LinkedIn has even come out with an article
that stated 85% of jobs are found through
internal networking. That means the networking
aspect is so important now that we’re going to
need to change something about ourselves in order
to be able to match that. And that’s what I found when
I was at college in BU, when I was just applying
for jobs online, and not getting final offers. I was making it to
second round interviews, but because I would refuse
to network at that time, I was so scared of networking,
I wasn’t getting to the place where I wanted to be. It was only after
college that I really discovered that, found out how
to develop my LinkedIn profile, found out how to use
in-person networking to make this work for me in
such an effective way that I’ve gotten jobs
in the Senate Banking Committee, the Federal
Reserve System, and more recently at a bank
in the United States. So there were a lot of ways
of me using my own networking system, including online, that
I want to share with you today so that you can have
the most effective job search possible as well,
spending less time on your job search but using your
time more efficiently. So that’s what we’re
going to talk about now. So here’s the reasons
to use LinkedIn. And this is solely to
show you just how much it’s time to move your
intention into action. First, 98% of recruiters
and 85% of hiring managers are using LinkedIn to find
candidates every single day. That’s a huge percentage. It’s not like LinkedIn
is a small social network system anymore. In fact, a lot of
the people who you don’t see on Facebook
who are very high level people in companies
these days, a lot of my– actually, a lot of my clients– are not even on Facebook. They’re more on LinkedIn because
that’s a professional network that they use and they
won’t even check Facebook every single day. So if you want to be reaching
the top people in your company, the people with decision-making
power, being on LinkedIn is going to be the
place to be and to have a professional presence there. Next, professionals at all
levels are now using LinkedIn. Entry level, middle
management, executives, they’re all trying
to keep in touch with current and
former colleagues as well as engaging with
the broader industry that they work in
through LinkedIn in. And this is going
to be the way that moves you into the future
with your job search as well. It’s so, so
important these days. Moreover, your LinkedIn profile
is more than just a resume or cover letter. In fact, it’s the supplement,
the complement to your resume and cover letter. So say that you submit
online a job application. The first place that people
go is your LinkedIn profile to see what else they
can find out about you. Since the resume tends
to be just a one page document and the
cover letter as well, you’re not getting tons of
information on each person. They want to know,
can I sit next to this person for the
next several years, if not for the next 10 years? And they are going to look
at your LinkedIn profile to get as much
information about you as possible through that portal. And the more you have about
people like to work with you, the more they have about the
kind of skillset that you have, the more likely you
are to get an interview and then to get the final job. So this is why it’s
so important now to be using LinkedIn in the
most effective way possible. So it’s time to network, right? We’re going to first
talk about the profile. And I want to say here
before I move forward, if you have any questions as
I present, please put them in the chat box as we go. That is the whole point of this. We will have Q&A
at the end but I do like to take questions
that relate to the slides that I’m working through as
we go so that you don’t forget your question. Say that I don’t answer
your question right away, write it down so that
you don’t forget it and ask me right at the end
if I haven’t gotten to it yet. But please do feel free
to ask as many questions as you want as
we’re going along. So who feels like
they don’t know where to start with updating
their LinkedIn profile? Say yes in the comments,
in the chat box. And don’t be shy. This is important
because everybody else is feeling the same way you are. Thank you, Julie, Daniel,
Ashley, Robert, Kristin, Kirsten, sorry. Thank you so much, everybody. This is really important to know
that you’re not alone in this. Let’s– and we’re going to move
forward through all the steps. So have your pen
and paper ready. We’re going to talk
through each step real– I’m going to try to go
quickly through some of them and hold on to– and stay
on some steps longer, depending on what
they are, you’ll see, because some of them have
the real meat and potatoes. The first and most important
piece, and I kid you not, this is so important and
it might sound like you are– it might sound
like it’s obvious, but it’s not obvious
to a lot of people. Having a professional headline
with your photo and name attached is the most
important element. If you do not have this,
people will not click. The second that you
don’t have a photo, people don’t click on you. If you have a standard
headline that anybody else can have from your
company, they’re more likely not to click on you. So you want to have
something that’s diverse, something that’s different. So for your headline, I
want you to choose something that not just speaks to
who you are as a worker, so say that your title is
a business analyst at IBM. There are so many
people who can put down business analyst at IBM, right? If that’s the only
thing that you have in your headline, and a
lot of other people have it too, the likelihood that
someone will click on you goes down tremendously. So what you want
to do is, instead of talking about yourself as
a business analyst at IBM, specifying what you actually
do as a business analyst because that’s a
very general term. Lots of people can
say that they’re a business analyst on IBM. But I’m going to
answer the question about the picture
in just a second, but let’s get clear on this. The title is so critical
because you’re not just a business analyst at IBM. You’re probably a
business analyst that works in a
health care sector or has an expertise
in engineering, or something like that. So say that you have an
engineering background but you work as a consultant. And it’s at IBM but your
title is business analyst. What I would say is
management consultant with engineering background. And not even mention IBM. And then I would
probably add something that’s a little bit
more personal to you. Like say that you like– that you are a runner. Runner of, you know, 10K
races or something like that. In that headline, the more that
you are unique to yourself, the more that you focus
on who you really are, the better the title
becomes, the headline becomes, and the more
likely people click on you. In terms of the photo,
what I would say is you need to have a
professional picture. I would never recommend to have
a casual photo of yourself. Because listen,
you’ve got Facebook for your casual photos. What you want is you
in professional dress and it’s a head shot with a
white background behind you, as much as you possibly can. I’m not saying go get a
professional shot done. Not at all. You can have your friend
take your picture. You don’t need to have it
be a professional head shot. But you do want it to look
professional in the attire that you wear so
you’re taken seriously. I just saw a question,
what goes under the title. Joanie, can you specify what you
mean what goes under the title so that I’m clear on that? And I saw a question, how
about recent graduates who do not have experience? As a recent graduate, I would
say what maybe your major is, where you’ve interned. If you’ve interned
in a marketing firm, I would say recent graduate
with marketing experience, and maybe state something
else about your background that might be unique to you. So I hope that answers that
question for [inaudible].. Joanie, it looks like you
listed your school and location. Actually, Joanie, those
pieces are automatically populated by LinkedIn,
so I don’t actually choose those myself. The part that you
do choose is where it says leadership and career
coach and policy analyst here, that’s the part that
you can specify. Julie, I see that you
mentioned the background. I would highly suggest
a white background as much as possible because it
makes you pop out of the photo. If you want to have
a purple background, see how much you pop
out of that background. If you’re blending in, you
really don’t– you want to make sure that you’re
not blending in. Hope that helps. So this is the most
important piece. These two pieces alone
will increase your chances of getting a click onto your
profile by as much as 14 times, just this piece. So make sure that you
have this handled. Make sure that you have the
headline designed in a way that it’s unique to you. Galaxy Note 8 says
what to write if you’re working in a different
field for temporary time, but your major interests, future
opportunity are different. Great question. So if you’re looking
to transition, I would state in your
headline that you are transitioning to a new field. Or you can state what your area
of expertise, which might not be where you’re
currently working but what you’re
transitioning into. So say that you came from
an engineering background but now you want to work
in business as a management consultant. I know this is my example,
but just work with me here. If you no longer want to
be known as an engineer, then focus on
saying transitioning to management consultant role. And state that you are– something like
that makes it clear where you’re at in your field. And you can say former engineer
if you want to include that. Sometimes I know management
consultants actually really like
engineering backgrounds for whatever reason. Galaxy Note 8, I
hope that helps. Jerry, advice for
someone with 30 plus years experience
in a field who wants to do something completely
different and unrelated, but still working, doesn’t
want current employer to know about desire for
complete life change. Jerry, that might be a
question that you and I need to talk about
one on one because it sounds pretty specific. If you don’t want to state
that you’re transitioning, you probably want to stick
to transferable skills into a completely new field. And look at it from
that perspective so that nobody knows on
LinkedIn that you’re trying to make a complete life change. But if you want to talk further
on that, let’s talk offline. OK, step two. This is important. This is the meat and potatoes
of your cover letter right here. You want to showcase everything
on your LinkedIn profile that you can not fit
onto your resume. So say that you only
have a small amount of real estate for your resume
for one particular job posting. So I’m including here, as
you can see, my experience as an associate at the Federal
Reserve Bank of New York. I don’t include all of this
information on my resume anymore. But I do include it
on my LinkedIn profile so people can see the fullness
of what I had done while I was at the New York Fed. So I include pieces that are
the most important on my resume based on what I’m applying for. And that’s to tailor the
resume to the job application. But when I go on my
own LinkedIn profile, consider it the master resume. So you want to have
everything that you possibly can have on that post. And you want it to
be clear what you are capable of at that time. So you’re writing it
longer, generally speaking. And you’re writing it
with tons of key words. I cannot stress enough how
important it is to have tons of key words. And you’ll know the key words
based on the job postings that you’re looking at. Or think about what you are
searching for on LinkedIn when you’re looking for
different industries and try to include those words
because most likely those are the words that hiring
managers and recruiters are also looking at. I am I’m getting
a question, I’ve heard that bullets shouldn’t
be listed as LinkedIn once a conversational tone,
short paragraphs, outlining accomplishments
and responsibilities. That I think will depend on you. Maybe that’s what
LinkedIn as a company wants to have a
conversational tone. I find that recruiters
and hiring managers really prefer bullets. So I tend to write
in bullet form. I’ve seen it done
both ways, that’s going to be a personal
choice for you which way you want to do it. I still maintain
bullets because that’s the way I would want
to read something to see what you’re capable of. Julie, I’m a current
grad student. Should I include
clubs and volunteer– we’re going to get to
that in a minute, Julie. So thank you for that. Joanie, does anyone link
their resume to their profile? I strongly encourage
you to do that. And they’re going to search
for it anyway, Joanie. Laura, for smaller
startups and nonprofits, is it helpful to add a
description of the organization before describing
your responsibilities? That could be a good way of
using your LinkedIn profile. It’s something I
strongly encourage not to do on your
resume but this is a place where
you can definitely do it in your profile. Joanie, and at some point
can you comment on– I can try to comment
on that, Joanie, but I’m going to caveat
that with saying, I am not a representative
of LinkedIn, so by no means am
I going to argue– I’m not a sales person. I don’t get any
funding from them, so I do want to state that
before stating anything else about their premium account. But we’ll talk about
that later down the road. So you want at least
your most recent two work experiences on LinkedIn,
but probably all of them eventually. You want the two most
recent right now. And when you build out the
fullness of your resume, you want every work experience
that you’ve had, say, post BU. I’ll put it that way. You don’t really need anything
from when you’re in high school or while you’re in college,
unless you have a work study job that you think can
help you get another job. I worked at the Office
of Financial Assistance while I’d BU for all four
years that I was there as a work study student. I include that on
my LinkedIn profile because I had had a lot
of office experience from that experience. So you choose based
on what you need. Then we move on to education. Here’s my education
part of my profile. So I include Boston University. I include Johns Hopkins. I think, Julie, this is
getting to your question. Janet, I would go
back as far as you can to when you graduated
from college. I know that some people feel
a little bit weird about that but I would include that
because anyway you’re going to include when you
graduated from college as well. So they’re going to need
to know how long have you’ve been in the
workforce any way, you might as well
just be clear on that. Yeah, Jerry, I would
say include as much as you feel comfortable doing. Michael, we’ll
get to the privacy questions in a few minutes. So here’s what I do
for the education. So Julie, pay attention,
this answers your question. I include any accolades, any
job, any interesting volunteer experience that I
had, any activities that I did in school. So this is how I arrange
my education section. And I’m very clear
about what I include because I don’t include a lot
of this information on my resume at all. I might include
that I’m Phi Beta Kappa from Boston University
and my GPA, and that’s about it. So just be clear how
much you want to include. You can even include
what kind of course work you’ve done here in case that
helps get certain buzzwords or keywords that people are
looking for in the field that you’re in, that can
be very useful as well. So after education, you want to
be thinking about your profile summary. This is at the very top
of your LinkedIn profile, right underneath
the headline piece. So you see at the
very top when you click on your LinkedIn profile,
your headline and your photo come in at the top. And then right underneath
that is this profile summary section. And this is the section which
is a free write section. And a lot of people miss
writing in this section, which is another place where you can
add a lot of keywords that will help people find your resume– find your LinkedIn profile. Because remember that the
whole site is based on– like everything is SEO, I
forget what that stands for. Something optimization. I apologize, my
head’s not really going to what it stands for. Search engine optimized. Ah, search engine optimization,
thank you for that. Clearly I am not a tech
person but I definitely know that this is a super
important area of LinkedIn. You want to be using as
many words as possible and your profile summary is
a great place to go for that. So say that you do want to
state that you’re transitioning from one area to
another, so this doesn’t go for everybody because I
know some people are saying that they want to
make a life change. If you want to be
clear that you’re making this transition now,
this is a great place to put it, where you state what you’re
doing to transition and why. And what your transferable
skill sets are from there. This is, essentially,
another way to have a cover letter
within your LinkedIn profile, as it were. I wouldn’t make it
super, super long. But a couple paragraphs is OK. And you’re just stating
what you want to be doing. And it’s not supposed to be a
regurgitation of your resume. I don’t want to be
seeing that here. What I really want to be seeing
is your humanity coming out, who you are as a worker. They want to hear your
voice rather than just seeing that, you know, you tick
the boxes of the job posting. This is that place
to be able to do it. So as you can see
here, what I’ve written in mine is much more
geared towards how did I move into– sorry, hold on a second. Make sure that you
guys don’t lose me. How did I move into coaching? And it was very important
to be able to do that. Ashley, is this the place
to explain work gaps? Absolutely. So if you have a work
gap for whatever reason, if you went on maternity
leave, if you had a family medical issue, whatever it is, I
would definitely state it here. How would you suggest maternity
leave for a few years? Let’s put it this
way, [? ying ying, ?] nobody is going to be
surprised for a woman to take maternity leave,
or frankly, for a man to take paternity leave. It’s become much more normal
to have a stay at home moms or stand home dads. If this is what you’ve done and
you feel comfortable putting into your profile
summary, this is the place to do it, to address the gap. They’re going to ask you anyway. What about taking a gap
to care for aging parents? Same thing, Jen. You can be as clear as you
want to be in this section, whether it’s about
aging parents or not. That’s up to you how personal
you’re willing to go on here. But obviously, be
clear about what it is, like if it’s a medical leave,
if it’s a medical leave to take care of an aging
parent, whatever it is. Joanie, how do I say that I
resigned from corporate life without seeming
to be a criticism of my former employer? Joanie, I think I need
more background in order to be able to explain that. That might be a question
for a Q&A right at the end. MW Mu, a career
consultant I worked with advised that one should not
have resume posted on job sites as a general rule. How does one square that with
having it all out on LinkedIn? Or did I work with
the wrong guy? So I’m not going to
speak to whether or not you worked with the wrong guy. I’m just going to tell you
what my perception is of this. People are going to be looking
at your LinkedIn profile in connection with your job
application no matter what. I don’t know why
you wouldn’t have a resume posted on a job site
because in general, you want to have your name out there. You want people to
be able to find you when you’re looking for a job. So the only time
you wouldn’t do that is if you don’t want
your current employer knowing that you’re
looking for a job, right? And LinkedIn is the
place to post it. If you don’t want to post
your resume on a job site, totally fine. But you should have
your LinkedIn profile set up so that they
know that you’re serious about looking for work. And I’ve had former clients
on my former client, [inaudible],, for instance, has
gotten so much amazing feedback on his profile and
been told that they’re so impressed with him
because of how fulsome it is and how much information they’re
able to glean from his LinkedIn profile. Lay off gaps from B Sosa. Yeah, you can mention a
layoff gap if you want, but you don’t have to state
it so clearly that it’s a layoff, unless you want to. This is all about
how much you’re willing to put out and feel
comfortable with in a public presence, right, because this is
your professional social media presence. And you want to be clear
that you have a gap because they’re
going to know you’re going to have a gap anyway. Eventually they’re
going to find out so you might as well just
paint the picture for them and be completely transparent
because then you’re not going to be taken
into an interview and then they’re going to say,
oh, you have a layoff gap, I don’t want you to work for me. If you’re transparent
from the beginning, then maybe you won’t
get the interview but then you’re not
wasting your time. That’s how I view
your job search. Janet, how can you use
LinkedIn for a part time job or volunteer activity
once you’ve retired? Same thing, Janet. You can say in your
profile summary that you’re looking for part
time work or a volunteer activity and specify the kind
of area you want to be in. Sheldon, if you have
an extensive work history and multiple
careers, can you circumvent LI chronological
career experience format? I don’t believe so, Sheldon, but
that’s really what the profile summary here is– it’s a way to tie
everything together for you at the very top. That’s what I would do on that. John, we’re going to talk about
skills and recommendations in a minute. Karen, should you admit you
quit your current job in order to transition careers? Only if you’re
comfortable, Karen. Again, this is to
your level of comfort. And what I will say, Karen, is
that I’ve definitely admitted when I’ve quit my current job. But I felt comfortable
doing that. So I’m not going to tell you
to do it because you should. I want you to choose
if you’re comfortable. Whitney, can I recommend
we go through the rest of your presentation
and then Q&A? It’s hard– I definitely answer
questions off the fly, Whitney. I totally hear you
and I’ll try to– I’m going to go through a little
bit more of the presentation. And then about this,
I’ll stop for questions at certain points. So two more key points, and
I want to be very, very clear on these key points. So please write them down. If you are a business
analyst, find other ways to talk about yourself
because since a lot of people can use that kind
of generic term, I want you to get it clear. Maybe you do project management
as a business analyst. Maybe your business
analyst working in health care statistics. Maybe you are a
business analyst working with a marketing department. You want to get clearer on what
that generic term really means in your field and
state it as clearly as possible in your profile
summary, in your headline, as well as in your work
experience sections. OK, it is so important
to be able to do that so that you are saying– you’re painting
the story clearly of what you’re capable of. If you just say that
you’re a business analyst, nobody will know what you do. If you say that
you’re a consultant, there are tons of different
kinds of consultants. There are IT consultants. There are management
consultants. There are marketing consultants. There are, you know,
career consultants. Whatever the case
may be, there’s lots of different
ways of saying that. So you want to add
to the next level where they really understand
what you do on a daily basis. So make sure that you do that. The second key point,
and this is important, so make sure that you do
this, when you’re developing your work experience or
your education section, or your profile summary,
do it in Microsoft Word. And don’t put it on LinkedIn in
until you’re absolutely ready and everything’s finalized. You want to be
checking for grammar. You want to be
checking for spelling. You want to know what
kind of additional items you want to add in. There are ways to
download information. You can see under each section
you can put PDF’s, videos. You can be showing
pieces of your work, assuming that your company
would allow you to. So you can attach
different items as well. Know what you’re
going to be attaching. Know what you want to
say in each section. And then when you’re ready to
actually develop your LinkedIn profile and post it online with
everybody being able to see it, then lay it all out there. Copy and paste, dump it
out of the Microsoft Word, but not until you have it
all laid out and complete. It’s so, so important,
a lot of people forget this because each
time you edit on LinkedIn, it can announce it to
everybody on LinkedIn. And you don’t want it
announced on LinkedIn. You’d rather have them all
figuring this out like in one go where you’re posting– you post everything
and they just say, oh, the LinkedIn
profile has been updated and it updates once. It’s a much more
effective strategy and it gets less people
paying attention to the fact that you’re making
tons of changes to your LinkedIn profile. So strongly encourage that. So we’re going to move
on to the next piece. So somebody asked me about this. We have a news
section where we talk about the accomplishment-based
areas of your resume. This used to be a very
different section on LinkedIn but they changed
the layout of it. So what you can do now is put
certifications, courses, honors and awards, languages
that you have, publications,
projects, et cetera. I would build this up
as much as possible. For instance, under project, you
can put volunteer projects that relate to the career that you
want to have, for instance, or might relate to something
entirely different. But this is a
section where you can keep adding more keywords and
more accolades to who you are. I don’t tend to put
test scores in here but if you’re fresh
out of college and you’re looking
to go to grad school, for instance, maybe
putting your GRE or GMAT would be worth it to
you there because most likely the school is going to be
looking at your LinkedIn profile as well. You can also put any
publications here. So say that you are a PhD
and you have a dissertation, you want to put that
down, put that down. There’s so many things you
can add in this section that bolsters your resume and
your LinkedIn profile at the same time. Now, someone asked me
about the skills section. This is really
important as well. What I do with
the skills section is I add everything that
seems pertinent to me. You can add all the pieces
that you want to be known for, and then by going
under add new skill. See that here? That’s exactly how you do that. You add more skills
and then what I do– and this is different than
what a lot of people do– you can have LinkedIn notifying
people to endorse you. But what I find to be more
effective, a lot of people only jump on LinkedIn for
short periods of time. If you have friends who want to
build up their LinkedIn profile and you’re building up yours,
why not email them with a link to your LinkedIn
profile and say, hey, do you mind endorsing me? And even specify
which things you’d like to be endorsed for
so that you’re building up those specifically and they know
to reach out to you on that. So that can be a
very effective way for you to build up
the endorsement section so people know that you are
known for certain skills. And this also builds
up the keyword function as well because the
more people that you want knowing about policy
analysis, the better. So for me, I have 30 people here
from my old, old profile who were focused on policy analysis,
that was super important for me at that time, because
that’s where I was working and I really wanted
people to know me for policy analysis
and public policy. So I was asking people
through my email to endorse me and I got lots more people
to endorse me that way. There’s also a new
way that LinkedIn has been doing endorsements. So this screen can pop up
from the endorsements section. And you toggle
between whether you want to be endorsed,
whether you want to be included in an
endorsement suggestions to your contact connections. And at the same
time I would also say show me suggestions
to endorse my connections. You want to be
endorsing people just as much as you want
to be endorsed. So the way to see
this as a win-win is to have people endorsing
you and you endorsing them so it’s kind of you scratch
my back I scratch yours. This is really important. Jerry, no offense, but if
everyone solicits and obtains endorsements in that
way, doesn’t that make endorsements
generally meaningless? How much weight do employers
put on endorsements? It’s a way to boost up your SEO
within your LinkedIn profile, Jerry, so that’s why
it’s important to keep having more people add to it. And remember, not everyone cares
about their LinkedIn profile. We have 75 participants right
now on this webinar right now. That’s a very small
majority pool, I should say, of people
who use LinkedIn. So if you guys are
doing it, great. You’re going to improve
your LinkedIn profiles. Most people don’t
do all of this stuff because they don’t think
that it’s valuable for them and they don’t see
the value in it. So when you think about
it, not all people are going to be soliciting
and obtaining endorsements. It’s going to be a very
small pool of people who are go getters
for their job search. So I hope that helps. Next, a piece that I really
want I want you to consider is showcasing yourself
as an expert on LinkedIn. This is also part of step two. You can post now on LinkedIn
similar to how Facebook works and use the news feed
section to bolster who you are as an expert. So you want to be doing this
on a regular basis as well. This is a way for people
to keep coming back to you every single week
and looking at your LinkedIn profile. The more that you post,
the more opportunities that your network has
to keep thinking of you as an expert in your field. So not everybody
is in a job search. You don’t need to
be in a job search to want to network
effectively in LinkedIn. Some of the most
effective job searches are the ones when you’re not
job searching at all but people know you as an expert already
and they approach you and say, hey, are you interested in
considering this other job that I have available? The way that you
get known for that is by doing these
kinds of posts. And you can be
re-posting articles. You can be re-posting
articles, maybe not like resharing other people’s
articles that they already shared on LinkedIn. But say that you’re reading
articles in the morning and you find something
that’s unique to your field and you have a unique
perspective on it. I wouldn’t just
post the article. I would post your unique
perspective on it, saying, based on my knowledge
of this field, this is my understanding– this
is what I think works really well in this article
and why I think that you should be
paying attention to it and read here for more. Or something like that. That’s an effective
way of using it so it’s not just
you re-posting, it’s you adding your
perspective to it. And that can be very effective. Hope that helps, Johnny. So before I move on to the
strategically connect piece, I notice that
recommendations wasn’t– that somebody asked a question
about recommendations, so I do want to address that
real quick because that’s part of all of this as well. You want to be recommended for
different things in addition to endorsements. And part of that
is strategically connecting with
people, so we’re going to get into that
a little bit more in a minute with the
strategic connection. But think of it as this, the
more people you strategically connect to, the more
recommendations you can have. And you want to at
least one recommendation per previous work experience,
as much as you humanly possibly can. Note that I don’t
have recommendations for all of my previous work. But what I do try to
have is recommendations for my most recent
work at the very least because that is the
most important piece. And there are some
places where I just don’t have enough of a
connection with the people I used to work with,
or they may not even be on LinkedIn, so I might not
had somebody to recommend me for those previous position. So anybody who’s been
working for 30, 35 years, I totally hear you. I don’t expect you
to go back to 1970 and have somebody who
was your first boss write you a recommendation. Don’t hear me saying that. But as much as you possibly
can, for the most recent work experience, that’s going to
be super useful because people want to see that you’re a
human, and those recommendations are super helpful in doing that. In order to get those
recommendations, you need to strategically
connect with people that you have previously worked with. So that’s one of the people who
you want to be connecting with, current and former colleagues. Those are some of the
most important people to connect with because
they know your work history. They know who you are. And the more you connect
with them, the more likely you are to have connections
to other hiring managers and recruiters that are
also looking for you. And they might know
your former colleague, but they might not
know you directly. They might reach out to
your former colleague and ask about you before they
ever reach out to you directly. So you want to connect with
as many current and former colleagues as possible. Next, you want to
connect with other people you know in the industry. Say that you go to conferences. When you go to
those conferences, get people’s business cards. Connect with them on LinkedIn. And don’t just leave it as,
oh, let’s connect on LinkedIn and never talk again. You want to be talking to them. You don’t want to just
be reaching out once and then have them in the
back of your LinkedIn profile. That doesn’t work
effectively as networking. Instead, you want to
be reaching out to them every once in a while
and saying, hello, how are you doing? Or connecting with
them over posts, you know, some
kind of an article that you think might be
useful to them, something that builds more of a deeper
connection using LinkedIn. Think about how
you use Facebook, you want to be using LinkedIn
maybe in a similar way. Maybe not as often
as you use Facebook, but you want to be using it so
that you’re actually connecting with people through LinkedIn. I will answer a
couple more questions in a couple of minutes. Let me just finish this slide. Next, you want to
connect with friends. The reason why is you don’t
know who your friends know. You have your inner
circle of friends. And they might have people
who work in a completely different field than you. They might be working
in advertising and you’re working as a
management consultant. And you might think, why
would I connect with them on LinkedIn as a result? You don’t know who they know. And they might not even
remember who they know. The benefit of
LinkedIn is that you might be checking out and
researching who knows or who, or who is a
management consultant because you’re looking
for a new position or you might be looking up
or researching a company. You want to see who
your friends know because they’re the most
likely people to say, yeah, I’ll help you out. And they’re your friends, right? They want to help you out. So you’re going to want to be
connected with them on LinkedIn so you know who your mutual
contacts are, because you see the number the
degrees of separation that you have with
different people. Next, you also want to
connect to classmates. This is your BU alumni. This could be your grad
school classmates, PhD. This could be classmates
from that yoga certification that you did. Whatever it is for you, you want
to be adding your classmates onto this as well so that
you have as many people as possible because it is really
about who other people know and being able to connect
all of those people. It’s not necessarily
about the people who are directly connected
with you because you know what they know. You might know where they work. But you don’t know who they know
who expands your network way beyond. And then you have
a new set of people that you can always
be reaching out to. That is going to be
the most helpful thing. Thank you, Grace and Tony,
I love this photo, too. Next, personalize your message
when asking to connect. This is one of my
sticking points because I have so many
people every single day reaching out to connect
with me on LinkedIn. And there’s this
very dry message that comes up that says, I’d
like to connect with you, you know, something
like, I’d like to connect with you through
my professional network on LinkedIn or
something like that. It’s so dry. If you don’t tell me
where you’ve met me and why you want
to connect, I’m not going to want to
connect with you. It’s as simple as that. So if I have no idea why
you’re connecting with me, then it’s meaningless to me. I want to know why you
want to connect with me. And let me put a personal plug. If you want to connect
with me on LinkedIn, state how you met me and
what I can do to help you. So feel free to do that on
your LinkedIn as a test run for this because it’s super
important to personalize your message every single
time you connect with someone. Say that you are reaching
out to former classmates that you haven’t been in
contact with in 20 years, hey, I know we haven’t been in
touch but I’d love to reconnect and have a phone conversation. You can put that as
your personalized message on LinkedIn. super, super important
and very, very helpful. Next, LinkedIn has
created these groups. And right now I believe
they’re in a transition to mold the two sides together. They kind of tried
to separate it so you have your
LinkedIn profile and then have a separate
groups section that opens up into a new browser page. I think they’re trying
to reconnect the two, but I haven’t really seen what
LinkedIn is fully doing yet. You know, they’re kind of going
slowly through this as they’re revamping their page. But what they have is
these LinkedIn groups and they consider them
separate right now. You can reach out
to them and start seeing what kind of
LinkedIn groups are there. If you work in
the tech industry, there’s tons of tech groups. There’s Ted Talk groups. There’s environmental
groups, business groups, women’s groups, whatever you
can find, you’ll find it there. You just have to
search for it and then start adding different groups. I believe begin to add up to
50 groups on your profile. And you want to be finding
groups that are super active. So I found one of the
most active groups am a part of is this Ted
Talk group, where people are constantly posting stuff and
answering questions there and so on. And then I want you to start
posting within those groups as well, the ones that are
most effective for you. And start seeing what
catches people’s attention. Ask questions
within those groups. Answer other people’s
questions within those groups. Start conversations. You’re going to start
seeing people wanting to connect with you
on LinkedIn simply because of the relationships
and the conversations that you’re having about
different expertise. I’ve had tons of new connections
just through that alone. So now I’m going to stop and
answer a couple more questions. B Sosa, how do you approach
someone that recently you requested to join to your
network and he/she works at your company that you
applied for a position and would like to get in
contact with the hiring manager. I honestly think, B
Sosa, that it’s not super helpful to try to connect
with someone when you already are looking for a job, right? When you’ve looked for a job
posting, for instance, and then you look up on LinkedIn trying
to find who the person is. You can reach out
to the person who’s the hiring manager in an
attempt to get in contact with the hiring manager. But people often feel
used when you do that. You want to be building
connections much more organically than that. And that’s what I find to
be the most supportive. People don’t want to
feel like you’re just using them for a transaction. People want to feel like you
want to be friends with them. So what I’ve done
in the past when I’ve looked for jobs is I
reach out not to people who know the hiring manager,
I just reach out to people who were
in the position that I found for a job posting. And they say, hey, I’d
really like to hear more about what you’ve been
doing in this role, would you mind having a
phone conversation with me? That to me, has been
the most effective way of moving forward. And some of those
people then put my name and for jobs that they
have at their company. So rather than
focusing on trying to get in contact with a
very specific person in order to find out more about the
job, how to just reach out to someone who works in
that position already? Much better and it’s a way to
connect with people much more organically. Joanie, if you belong to a
group and you post to the field, does it automatically
go to the group? It goes to the group and it
shouldn’t go to your news feed. There’s a general news feed and
then there’s like the group. It’s kind of similar
to Facebook where there are these
private groups, you can post just in
that private group. Let’s see, Julie,
you asked a question. Is it appropriate to
connect with someone that you just interviewed with? I have done that
and it’s been fine. I generally do it after I’ve
already interviewed with them, even if I’ve already looked
at their LinkedIn profile before that. But I wouldn’t do
it before as a way to learn more
about the position. That often gets
a little bit icky and sometimes HR
doesn’t like that. John, you can change the
notification of settings. LinkedIn has changed their
skills layout to groupings, however how hard
to tell what skills fit under which grouping. John, I’m not sure what
you’re referring to but let’s talk offline about that. Now I’m going to move forward. OK, leveraging LinkedIn. This is step four. And this is the part where
most people kind of stop. And so I want everyone to
be clear on this piece. This is super important. You want to start
connecting with people that you don’t necessarily
know on LinkedIn. And you’re reaching out to
find out about new positions. So say that you’re a scientist. You want to move to a new area. Say that you live
in New York City you want to move to California. You don’t really
know anybody out in California who
works as a scientist. I’m making this up
but just bear with me. You start looking up
different, maybe, universities in California that have
big science departments or something like
that, that they’re known for certain areas. And you see someone
who’s interesting to you but you don’t know what to say. Basically, you find
this person on LinkedIn and you have 300 characters to
write an introductory message to them. That’s all you get when
you’re not connected with somebody already. And you want to
say in that message that you are interested in
hearing from them about what they do in their
current line of work or what they do in
their current job. And express that
you’d like to have a phone conversation with them. That’s all you want to
really be talking about in that 300 characters,
because 300 characters is not a lot of words. But you want to be
focused entirely on them and see how they respond to it. That being said,
some people will not respond because they’re
not on LinkedIn very much. Do not take offense to this. They might respond months
down the road, which has happened to me before. But you want to be reaching out
to as many people as possible and see who bites because
that has happened for me as well, where some people
definitely don’t respond to me, but some people
do and then I have some of the most powerful
conversations in networking through that process. And it’s all through
reaching out to someone who I don’t know. When you’ve seen a job
posting that interests you, I obliquely referred to this. What I would do is start
looking up the company, finding the other people
who work in that company, not necessarily at
the top of the house. I would look for people
who are of the position that you’re looking for and
ask if you can have a phone conversation with
them in a similar way, through that 300 character
original message. And see if they’re
willing to talk to you. Do not mention the job posting. I don’t want to hear anything
about the job posting because this is when
people feel icky. Imagine if someone reached out
to you on LinkedIn and said, hey, I just saw a
job posting and I wanted to know what you
thought my chances were of being able to get
that job, or can you help me get that job? You’ve never talked
to this person before. You’ve never met this person. This person owes you nothing. What you want to do is be asking
about what they do for work, like what do they enjoy it? Do they like it? What is it that they dislike? What is it that they
do on a daily basis? You want to learn
about the job, and then see if they actually
offer to help you get a job with their company. When you’re exploring a
new industry or company, that’s awesome as well. Career transitioners, you
want to be finding out as much information as
possible about the area where you want to
transition into. So you want to be looking
up different industries. So let’s talk about advertising. Say you’ve never been
in an advertising job, maybe been in marketing
for a long time but you haven’t had
an advertising job and you want to work at,
say, Arnold Worldwide, which is a big company I know
at least in Boston, but is across the United
States, and probably the world. Named worldwide– Arnold
Worldwide, obviously. You’ve never worked in
this company before. You’ve never worked
in advertising. You look up Arnold
Worldwide and you find a couple people who live
in your general vicinity, or maybe live in Boston,
or Chicago, or whatever. Maybe they’re connected through
somebody else that you know. You want to reach out
to them and ask them for an introductory
conversation to tell you more about the industry,
or more about the company. That’s what you’re putting
in that 300 characters. So again, over and
over and over again, you’re focused on
what this person can do to help you understand. You’re information gathering. That’s the best way
to leverage LinkedIn and to get the most connections
rather than saying, hey, I’m looking for a job. People don’t want to hear
that because everybody’s looking for a job on LinkedIn. Do something unique that
helps you be the person who’s interested in the other person. And when that person feels
like they matter to you, then you’ve changed the game. Step five, show
up as the expert. So we talked about
posting, right? Start conversations. Participate in conversations
in LinkedIn groups. Continue to post on your
own news feed as well, showing your expertise. Endorse and recommend your
contacts on a regular basis. Set up a schedule for yourself
to be able to do this. Don’t just do it
once and you’re done because that limits
the amount of activity that you spend on LinkedIn. You want to be constantly there. You want to be constantly
moving with your people and your contacts
so that they’re seeing that you’re active. And when you’re more
active on LinkedIn, you rise higher in the
search engine function. So when someone else is looking
for someone of your skill set, of your caliber, they’re
going to find you sooner because you’re
more active on LinkedIn. So you’re reworded
for more activity. And follow up with
contacts that you’ve had private or public
conversations on LinkedIn, or in person and
you’ve then connected with them on LinkedIn. You want to make sure
that you’re constantly available to them
so that you are showing your interest in them. So when you are
looking for a job, by the time you look for
that job, you can say, hey, what do you know about this job? And they’re more
likely to help you because you’ve been connected
with them the whole time. Galaxy Note 8, should we
include our blog posts as I like to write but that may
not necessarily get published? Yeah, I included like blog
posts every single week as a career coach for a
long time on my LinkedIn. It was a way for me to
connect with people. And people who were reading
it and then reposting it, or just sending me
private messages or maybe public messages about my blogs. It depends on if you want to
be known for your blog or not. Say that I have a
food blog it’s not what I want to be known
for as a professional, then most likely I’m not going
to post about my food blog unless I’m thinking of it as
a way to show my humanity. I want to create the most
professional image of me that talks about me as an
expert in the field that I want to go into. And if I want to
add my humanity, I might add that I have
a food blog on my profile but not post those blogs every
single week to my news feed. I hope that makes
sense, Galaxy Note 8. So what we’ve learned
thus far, the importance of having an updated LinkedIn
profile for networking. We’ve talked about
the five steps to crafting a LinkedIn
profile that stands out. And we’ve talked about how
to strategically network on LinkedIn in a way that
feels more authentic. That’s all about the information
gathering rather than saying, I am looking for a job. I know that there are at least
some questions I didn’t answer, so please post your questions. Now’s the time for Q&A. Thank you so much, Lisa. I can’t believe that the
hour has already flown by. And I think you did a really
wonderful job answering so many questions
right along the way. I would certainly
encourage folks who are participating, if
you have something that’s unique to you, a
conversation that you do want to have offline,
Lisa’s posted her website there on the screen. Go ahead and copy that down. We’re getting great
feedback already, really great presentation
and so informative, I completely agree. So again, additional
questions can go to Lisa. You can find her
website right there. Connect with her on LinkedIn. Don’t send her that
generic message that’s automatically generated. Let her know how you met. Let her know that it was the BU
webinar that she hosted today. So thank you, thank you, again. Lisa, do you have
anything, any last thoughts that you wanted to add
before we wrap things up? Thanks, Dan. Can I answer the
last couple questions I’m seeing right here? Go ahead, absolutely. Thank you, Chang, you can
definitely ask to grab coffee. Some people might not want you
if you haven’t met them before. So usually a phone
conversation is a little bit of a safer request
so that they don’t feel so uncomfortable with you. And then they might say,
let’s grab coffee, after that. But build it up slowly because
these are some people who you’ve never met before. Julie, if we held
different positions with the same
company, do we want different entries for each
position or just group them all under the
same company section. Julie, you can do it either
way, but the main point is having those keywords. And I don’t think it matters
too much which way you do it because, as you saw in
my New York Fed position, I included different
rotations in there and said the time frame
that I worked in them. That’s one way to do it
because I was internally rotating within the company
still as an associate. If you had different
titles, maybe you want to separate it out. That’s going to depend on you. Elise, can we get our
LinkedIn profiles evaluated? If you’d like that,
reach out to me on my website,
myheartalchemist.com. And there’s a contact
section and we can talk about doing a consultation. Dan, I think you’re
getting a question. Yeah, absolutely. Are there any folks
attending this webinar that want to connect? Is there a way to get
my name out to them? One thing that I
would recommend is, if you’re not already a part of
the BU alumni LinkedIn group, it’s a group that has just about
39,000 members on LinkedIn. So I would encourage you,
Jen, if you’re comfortable and you are looking
to connect, go ahead and start a conversation
within that group. You can write something about
how you attended this webinar and you are looking
forward to continuing to broaden your alumni network,
and see who reaches out with you that way. We’re always looking
for people– for alumni to share their expertise, to
share their job opportunities at their company within the
BU alumni LinkedIn group. So I think that’s a
perfect space for that. Awesome All right. Well– [interposing voices] Thank you again. Again, we can’t thank you
enough for your expertise. I know you are not new to the
BU alumni webinar presentation series. And so again, we are so grateful
to have you, for your time, for your expertise, and
for the attention that you gave each and every panelist
who submitted a question. So on behalf of the entire
BU Alumni Association, I do want to say thank you. My thanks also of all of our
guests participating today. And I specifically
want to thank those who have donated to BU in the past. We couldn’t put programs like
this on without your support. And while Alumni Career
Week 2018 wrapped up at the end of
March, we still have a number of great career
programs coming up, a webinar in
transforming education, speed networking for
education, health care, nonprofit professionals,
and live interview with a nonprofit CEO. You can see all of these
programs on our website, bu.edu/alumni/events. And you can filter by
career and professional. So as always, if you or
any BU alumni you know would be interested
in presenting a professional
development webinar or showcasing a topic for
the Alumni Association, please feel free
to reach out to me. You can call the
Alumni Association or you can send me an
email, [email protected] So thank you again,
everyone, for your time. And I hope you have a great
day or evening, wherever you might be. Thanks again, Lisa. Thanks.

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